Theatre Production Hecuba Expands Students’ Experience with Dramatic Arts

Students rehearse for Hecuba, which opens Thursday. This marks the first time in 10 years that PBA Theatre presents a Greek tragedy.PBA Theatre’s production Hecuba opens Thursday, marking the first time in a decade that the program presents a Greek tragedy.

The play is a new version of the Greek myth by Euripides. Tickets are still available for the 2 p.m. Saturday performance. Call (561)-803-2970 between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m., or email ticket_central@pba.edu to reserve a seat.

Although the story is a tragedy, the play includes song and dance numbers, said Director Allen McCoy.

“The Greek plays provide so many opportunities to combine all the arts. There’s no one way to do it. You can be as creative as possible with it.”

Sam Theriault ’19 composed original music, and adjunct professor Amy Hamel ’95 choreographed the play with assistance from Jesse McCoy. Assistant Professor of Theatre Dana White ’14 designed the set, which is similar to an acting studio in that there aren’t a lot of props, McCoy said.

“The students are enjoying it because it’s nothing like they could have imagined,” McCoy said.

Dr. Samuel Joeckel’s dramatic literature class is reading Hecuba and will attend the play and a talkback session on Friday. The play gives so much artistic freedom that the students will have no clue how it will be presented on stage, McCoy said.  

As for the story, it serves as a cautionary tale — how not to live — and explores the darkest side of life.

“I just try to be the most artistic as I can,” McCoy said. “It incorporates a lot of visual art, light, dance and music to set a mood.”


Photo: Students rehearse for Hecuba, which opens Thursday. This marks the first time in 10 years that PBA Theatre presents a Greek tragedy.