Students walking on PBA campus

Interdisciplinary Research Conference 2021

 

About

The Interdisciplinary Research Conference allows students and faculty to share a variety of research findings with the Palm Beach Atlantic community. Every year, the conference is recorded on video to ensure the research and presentations are preserved for archival purposes, the participants and families and for anyone else interested in viewing the lectures. Below you will find the virtual Interdisciplinary Research Conference 2021.

 
 
 

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Keynote Speaker 

 

Dr. Tom Chesnes

About Dr. Thomas C. Chesnes

Dr. Thomas C. Chesnes, Associate Dean School of Arts & Sciences, is the keynote speaker for the University’s annual Interdisciplinary Research Conference 2021. 

Chesnes, winner of the 2015 Charles & Hazel Corts Award for Outstanding Teaching, is a highly-published researcher who routinely invites his students to join him in his fieldwork. His address explores what happens when critical thinking leads us to differ with our tribes — people of the same family, faith or politics, he said.

 

“As believers, we can rest in the truth that all truth is God’s truth. As we recognize that, we lose some of that fear of bumping up against tribal boundaries.” Dr. Thomas C. Chesnes

 

Keynote Address: A Conscientious Objection to the Scientific Culture War

Keynote Address: A Conscientious Objection to the Scientific Culture War

Dr. Thomas C. Chesnes, Associate Dean

School of Arts & Sciences

Department of Biology

 

About

Perceived conflicts between science and theology have created divisions amongst the faithful, especially in recent history. Our society, particularly youth in traditional and religious educational contexts, are bombarded by seemingly opposing viewpoints on issues regarding faith and reason. These perceptions often lead to the impression that faith and science are in conflict, thus driving earnest seekers away from one discipline or the other. These “casualties of interpretation” within the scientific culture war are unwarranted and unnecessary.

We will discuss the historic context of the science culture war, domain limitations of science and philosophy (where often overstepping leads to unfounded claims and arguments in the other) and the current “fronts” of the scientific culture war in relation to faith: origins (past), biomedicine (present) and environmental stewardship (future).

 

Sessions & Presentations

Special Sessions

Service-Learning as a Tool for Teaching Corporate Social Responsibility

 

Dr. Velma Lee1 & Dr. David Horkott2

Rinker School of Business1

Department of Philosophy2

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

Dr. Velma Lee teaches an undergraduate Leadership and Ethics course in the Rinker School of Business. Some sections of this course require a service-learning project.  These student projects served as the basis of Dr. Lee’s research. The question that Dr. Lee sought to answer was whether or not a particular service-learning project deepened student learning of corporate social responsibility (CSR).  Specifically, she wanted to find out whether students would change their perceptions of the organization’s commitment to social responsibility after the students had completed their project.  In other words, “How did students’ perceptions of the CSR motive (ethical quality) of the organization’s mission change—if at all?” 

Hartman and DesJardins’s 2011 CSR model (view here) provided the theoretical underpinning for this research. Students were taught this theory in class prior to their service-learning project experience. Based on this theory, Dr. Lee created a student survey that gauged students’ perceptions of the organization’s motivation for giving to the community.  This survey was taken before and after students completed their service-learning project made possible by the community organization. Did the organization have ulterior or altruistic motives (or a combination of the two)?  This presentation will share the survey results and its ramifications.

Dr. David Horkott, faculty fellow for service-learning, did not work with students or the community partner.  He advised on the research design and provided editing and feedback on the student surveys.  He also researched service-learning publications and is currently co-writing a proposed journal article with Dr. Lee. He will discuss the pedagogical utility of the project for teaching ethics to business students.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

"Coming-of-Age Narratives in Film"  

 

Moderated by Dr. Samuel Joeckel, English Department

 

Panelists:

Joker: Re-defining the Coming-of-Age Genre

Samantha Wilber

English Department, School of Arts & Sciences; School of Ministry

 

A Clockwork Orange as a Coming-of-Age Narrative

Sydney Bulthuis

 

Wasted Talent Put to Use: Coming of Age in a Bronx Tale

Cailan Owens

English Department, School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

Since its inception in the late eighteenth century, the coming-of-age narrative has created generic conventions, re-worked those conventions, and even undermined them. This panel features three papers that explore these conventions in three modern films: Joker, A Clockwork Orange, and A Bronx Tale.

Notes: undergraduate student. 

Feminism, Marriage and Motherhood in Women’s Literature

 

Moderated by Dr. Jenifer Elmore

English Department

 

The Gestation of Feminist Theory

 

Cailan Owensa

English Department

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

This paper investigates the legacy of Mary Wollstonecraft’s proto-feminist work, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, specifically in the realms of motherhood and education. Kate Chopin’s “Desiree’s Baby” and Mary Wilkins Freeman’s “The Revolt of Mother” act as supportive texts which help reveal the progress-- or lack thereof-- of feminism approximately a century after Wollstonecraft’s work.

Notes: undergraduate student. b graduate student

Anne Tyler and the Relationship Between Nurture and Self-Esteem

 

Holly Heersa

English Department

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

In her 1988 novel, Breathing Lessons, Anne Tyler uses her female characters to illustrate a number of the everyday realities present in the lives of American women, such as the challenges of marriage, motherhood, and struggles with self-esteem. She uses Maggie, specifically, in order to demonstrate the close relationship between those challenges, suggesting that a woman’s self-esteem is often dangerously dependent upon her perception of her success as a nurturer. Tyler’s use of Maggie depicts an unhealthy example of a woman finding her identity within the role of a nurturer, as Maggie is constantly seeking opportunities to nurture and using nurture as a means of manipulating and controlling situations within her own and her family’s life. Maggie’s relationships with others and with herself demonstrate the close association between nurture and self-esteem and suggest that women often feel that they are deserving of love only if they earn it through duty and nurture.

Notes: undergraduate student. b graduate student

The Active Mother and the Passive Mother

 

Neysa Rogersa

English Department

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

This paper demonstrates the impacts of two complex experiences of motherhood as they are depicted in Nella Larsen’s Quicksand and Mary Wilkins Freeman’s “The Revolt of Mother.” Freeman’s Sarah Penn represents an active motherhood as she resists the unjust disregard from her husband, and maintains a resilient work-ethic in the home. Meanwhile, Larsen’s Helga Crane embodies a passive version of motherhood due to her lack of support, unrealized sense of self, and the generational trauma inflicted by her own mother. The societal expectations of women force Helga and Sarah into either active resistance for the assertion of the self or passive denial of the self as a form of escape. The circumstances of each character allow the audience to develop a deeper understanding of the literary depictions of motherhood as well as the societal expectations which affect not only the mother but womankind.

Notes: undergraduate student. b graduate student

The Advantage of Double Consciousness for Sarah Penn and Maggie Moran

 

Cassidy Stauffera

English Department

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

Early research into the sociolinguistic dissimilarities between men and women acknowledges a disparity between the genders, but problematically frames women as the issue. Instead, this essay discusses the opportunism of a woman’s double consciousness and bilingualism in a patriarchal society as demonstrated through the female characters in both Anne Tyler’s Breathing Lessons and Mary E. Wilkins Freeman’s “The Revolt of Mother.” These women demonstrate that despite the minority status they maintain as women, they can empower themselves through their disadvantage to gain control of their respective situations.

Notes: undergraduate student. b graduate student

Oral Presentations

Program Evaluation at Burckle Place

Dr. Kathy McKinnon

School of Nursing

 

 

Background

Burckle Place is a transitional housing facility that provides trauma-informed services to homeless, and post-incarcerated women. Women’s rates of incarceration have increased by nearly 834%. There are 81,000 women released from prison and 1.8 million released from jail each year (Kajstura, 2019). When women do not have supportive services post-incarceration the likelihood of recidivism increases (Covington, 2019).

Methods

A program evaluation at Burckle Place was conducted to improve the overall program outcomes. The objective was to increase the rigor and structure of the program to prevent recidivism, and staff turnover. The Gender-Responsive Program Assessment (GRPA) tool Community Version by Stephanie Covington was used to help identify, analyze, and evaluate the program services at Burckle Place (Covington & Bloom, 2017).

Results

Recommendations were offered to improve the organization’s overall program. Results revealed elements of the program that needed the most improvement were administration and staffing, treatment planning, and program development.

Implications for Practice

The implications for practice include linking volunteers to generate community empowerment, serve as a foundational guide for other women’s service programs, provide future nursing students recommendations for DNP scholarly projects, establish a larger impact on state and national recidivism rates, and serve as a benchmark for other program evaluations. It will also provide improved quality of life for residents at Burckle Place including abstaining from recidivism, making healthier choices, and being more engaged and motivated to participate in program activities. The program evaluation provides a solid foundation of curricula and training for staff and the director to improve the organizational structure of Burckle Place. The recommendations in this project will strengthen healthy behaviors and demonstrate the importance of developing sustainable programs for this vulnerable population.

Effects Tides and Location have on the Abundance and Variation of Microplastics in the Surface Waters of the Lake Worth Lagoon

 

Kayla O’Brienb

Department of Biology

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

This study examined the effects tides and location have on the abundance and variation of microplastics in the surface waters of the Lake Worth Lagoon, an estuary on the east coast of south Florida. Three sites were chosen within the lagoon in the North, Central, and South. 1-liter water samples had an average of 8.625 microplastic pieces (n = 48). Fibers, fragments, and films were present in the samples. No microbeads were found. Fibers were the most common type of microplastic found. High tide samples had a higher average (high tide mean = 9.29, low tide mean = 7.96, df = 23). Edge and center samples were compared, and the results were statistically significant: edge samples had higher averages of microplastics (edge mean = 12.67, center mean = 7, p-value = 0.002, df = 11). Microplastics have been found to absorb and concentrate persistent organic pollutants, house harmful algae and microorganisms, and bioaccumulate. Coastal marine environments are at high risk for microplastic pollution. Understanding the abundance of microplastics in the LWL is important for preserving the health of the lagoon.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

The Real Effects of Shareholder Proposals: Diversification in the Context of Climate Change

 

Dr. Greg Tindall

Rinker School of Business

 

 

About

Extant literature has struggled to identify real effects of shareholder proposals, finding them to depend on their context. Progressively, climate change has gathered interest at annual meetings where shareholders present proposals related to the subject. The literature explains circumstances in which diversification can serve as a defense. I find that firms in receipt of shareholder proposals related to climate change diversify more, mostly into related industries. I find mixed evidence on wealth enhancements of diversification spurred by these proposals. I address endogeneity concerns in a variety of ways: a matching estimator, fixed effects, a placebo and GMM estimators. The robustness of my results suggests that shareholder proposals can have the real effect of prompting firms to diversify, largely into related lines of business, at least in the context of climate change.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

The Impact of Self-Deception on Leadership Effectiveness

 

Dr. Lane Cohee1 & Dr. Sam Voorhies2

1Rinker School of Business

2Director of the Center for Biblical Leadership, MacArthur School of Leadership

 

 

About

Self-deception in leadership occurs when leaders make mistaken assessments about themselves and act according to those assessments. Results can be unhealthy, if not destructive. To help mitigate this natural tendency, we first seek to characterize the overall life cycle of self-deceived leadership. Second, we offer a model, rooted in Scripture and research, explaining the behavioral root of self-deception. Finally, we present an alternate path toward leadership self-awareness, reinforcing a lifelong commitment to Christian spiritual formation.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Implementation of the Pharmacists' Patient Care Process in Experiential Patient Care Settings

 

Dr. Yolanda M. Hardy, Ms. Jessica Lendoiro, Kimberly Benaventeb, Austin Goliab, Nicole Hageb, Danielle Kenneyb, Callyn Parkerb, Shawn Petersonb, & Katerina Xub

Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy

 

 

About

 

Objective

 To determine Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) sites are utilizing the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process (PPCP) and the role of the student in the process.

Methods: Student investigators interviewed their preceptor regarding knowledge and incorporation of the PPCP into practice. An observational model was used by student investigators to record their role during patient encounters. Student investigators developed recommendations for further incorporation of the PPCP into practice sites.

Results

Data was collected from 10 rotations and 13 preceptors. Sixty-two percent of the preceptors indicated an awareness of PPCP. Two hundred seventy-four patient encounters were recorded. The Collect, Assess and Plan steps accounted for 69% of the steps recorded in total, with 50% of the steps being recorded in General Medicine APPEs. Students were participants in 77.6% of the steps. Recommendations for improvement of PPCP were related to follow-up, collaboration, and documentation.

Conclusion

Preceptors utilize the PPCP, even if they don’t recognize the nomenclature. Students are participating in the PPCP at APPE sites. Increased awareness and utilization will maximize learning opportunities for students.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Why Dance?

 

Victoria Holmesa, Christine Hensona, Bailey Fergusona, & Dr. Jin Lee Hanley

Dance Department

School of Music & Fine Arts

 

About

Victoria Smith, a PBAU Dance alumna says, “Dance has been infused in my life such that it compliments, transcends, validates, enriches, and enhances my life all at once.”

PBA alumni, faculty, and staff, as well as many others around the country have shared the importance of dance in their spiritual, mental, and physical lives.

Specific scriptures of the Bible declare the beauty and power of worshipful dance! To have life is to move. Movement is life.

Mental health can also be treated through movement therapy. Issues such as anxiety, depression, PTSD, dementia and more have all been proven to be improved/treated with dance therapy.

Finally, physical benefits can be accomplished through dance. Many have found ways to make an income through this passionate art. Also, in this moment in history, dance is helpful for physical health. Exercising consistently can build antibodies that help fight viruses!

Overall, Dance is essential for many reasons to many individuals. How could dance be important to you?

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Aging CEOs legacy: Strategic CSR or Empire Building? Celebrity CEO and Board Independence Contingencies

 

Dr. Ciprian V. Stan & Dr. David Smith

Rinker School of Business

 

 

About

We examine the effect of the CEOs’ age on the likelihood of pursuing legacy enhancing activities. We argue that aging CEOs, who have a high level of entrenchment, are more likely to invest in legacy enhancing activities. While some aging CEOs cement their legacy by pursuing empire building activities, others choose to focus on CSR that also benefits the firm financially. The presence of an independent board can influence the type of legacy the CEOs may pursue, especially if the chairman of the board is not the CEO themselves. Celebrity CEOs, who have been awarded various honors for their perceived accomplishments, have a high level of power, overconfidence and hubris, and are thus more likely to invest heavily into building their legacy.

Service-Learning: Influence on Diversity and Justice

 

Lauren Rouba & Enrico Puccia

Department of Psychology

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

Research has indicated the value of service-learning (SL) in providing students with a more comprehensive understanding of the importance of their own social responsibility and the impact of their contributions to community (Cabedo et al. 2018). This study examines the impact that SL has on students by comparing students who have participated in SL coursework with a control group of students who have participated in community service without a classroom component. 638 PBAU students who completed the National Assessment of Service and Community Engagement (NASCE) participated in a minimum of 45 hours of community service per year as a University requirement, and 169 also took SL classes. In this study, results were assessed by analyzing student responses in two subscales from the NASCE: Diversity (α = 0.79) and Justice (α = 0.77). Qualitative data from individual interviews were also paired with quantitative data collected from the NASCE.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Creating Natural Immunity to Coccidiosis in Poultry Through the Administration of Feeds Supplemented with Probiotics Containing Streptomyces cinnamonensis

 

Mr. Gregory J. Rummo & Alyssa Macalusoa

Department of Chemistry & Physics

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

We have developed a new method for detecting Monensin in the lab. The technique allows small concentrations of the compound to be detected without using high-performance liquid chromatography.

Monensin is an antibiotic feed additive used to treat coccidiosis in poultry and other farm animals. Though the compound is effective at treating coccidiosis, it has a narrow therapeutic window – meaning that it can be toxic to poultry if the incorrect dose is used. The compound also has adverse reactions when combined with certain penicillin-based antibiotics like erythromycin.

According to PoultryMed, an online poultry resource, Monensin needs to be administered to broilers in 30 percent solutions in order to treat coccidiosis. Considering that most commercial Monensin solutions have a 40 percent concentration, being able to detect additional sources of the compound could help broilers avoid exposure to toxic doses.

In the current study, the researchers decided to use visible light spectroscopy to detect Monensin. This method lets researchers detect chemical substances based on the wavelengths of light the chemicals absorb and reflect.

This is a departure from current detection methods that rely on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Though HPLC can detect Monensin in the environment, it takes multiple, time consuming steps to reach a result. A simpler detection method that wasn’t reliant on HPLC equipment could ease workflows in the lab and provide quicker results in the field.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Spirituality, Depression, and Cognitive and Affective Life Meaning in College Students

 

Krystal Whitea & Dr. David M. Compton

Department of Psychology

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

Previous research has demonstrated a negative relationship between spirituality and depression. Research also suggests that one dimension of spirituality, life meaning, more strongly correlates with reduced depression. However, few studies have examined the difference between the cognitive and affective components of life meaning as they relate to spirituality or depression. Therefore, a survey containing the Spirituality Scale, Life Regard Index, and Beck Depression Inventory S-19 was administered to a sample of 108 American college students. The Life Regard Index consists of two subscales: the Framework subscale measures cognitive life meaning while the Fulfillment subscale measures affective life meaning.  In this sample, depression was predicted by the Framework (r = -.399, p < .001) and Fulfillment (= -.627, p < .001) subscales and by spirituality (r = .246, p = .010). Spirituality had a stronger relationship with Framework (r = .374, p < .001) than Fulfillment (r = .319, p < .001), perhaps suggesting that the protective effect of spirituality against depression is mediated partly through an intellectual avenue, such as the provision of a belief system with a logically coherent framework for life meaning.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Anti-Cancer Properties Associated to Thymol: A Plant-Derived Bioactive Molecule

 

Chloe Browna, Michael Reiffa, Dr. Cidya Grant1, & Dr. Christopher Hickey2

Department of Chemistry & Physics1

Department of Biology2

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 


About

An interest surrounds the roles that plant-derived bioactive molecules serve as cancer therapies. We provide evidence that Thymol, a bioactive molecule in Oregano, significantly reduces the proliferation of two cancer cell lines, THP-1 (leukemia) and A375 (skin cancer), while not impacting non-cancerous cells (HEK293). Two methods were used to analyze cellular proliferation: Trypan Blue Exclusion Assay and MTS Biochemical Assay. Upon evaluating Thymol, the proliferation of the THP-1 and A375 cells was reduced in a 0μM to 125μM dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, a significant reduction was observed for leukemia (37%) and skin cancer (20%) at 125µM Thymol. The non-cancerous cells remained unresponsive. We hypothesized that a common cellular receptor, TRPM8, is expressed on responsive cells and absent on non-responsive cells. We evaluated Thymol on a TRPM8-negative cervical cancer cell line (HeLa), which showed proliferation was unaltered. These observations suggest that TRPM8 might serve as the target cellular receptor for Thymol. Ultimately, we showed that Thymol selectively reduces proliferation of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner and the mechanism is likely mediated by the TRPM8 cellular receptor.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Being Mythopathic: C.S. Lewis on Theological Imagination

 

A.H. Mercantini IIa

English Department

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

This presentation is the culmination of my reflections on C.S. Lewis during a class I took in the summer of 2020 through Oxford. In my final paper, I deliberated over the merits of writing theology as imaginative literature, and I specifically researched Lewis’ own thoughts on humans as imaginative beings. One is never meant to dwell permanently in a house of fiction and imagination; and yet, one never feels more at home than when one is in a fantastic story. Into this literary tension comes the ever present reality of theology, of which we Christians have the most work cut out for us. Lewis acted as a guide for me to comprehend the complexities of the human mind, which is grounded in story and myth. Having written theology both into his worlds and abstracted from them, Lewis is aware that a hearty understanding of what it means to truly engage a story is essential for Christians to love creation as we ought.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Physical Modeling in Music and Audio After 50 Years: The Promise and the Future

 

Dr. Tim Thompson

School of Music & Fine Arts

 

 

About

2021 marks fifty years since Lejaren Hiller and Pierre Ruiz published the first description of digital sound synthesis by computation of a physical model in the Journal of the Audio Engineering Society. It has taken most of these 50 years to achieve convincing modelingbased synthesis of some acoustic instruments. Today, physical modeling synthesis is the basis for some of the best commercial and guitar software instruments, as well as new kinds of organic sounding instruments. Modeling based techniques have also found a place in other areas of audio processing, such as the modeling of the circuitry of analog audio processing equipment. The potential for physics-based creation and processing of audio in video games and VR applications has been described and championed, but it is still not widely realized. This paper presents a brief review of the history and current state of the art in physical modeling, a look at the potential for “procedural audio” in games and VR applications, and a vision of the future for physical modeling techniques.

"Sell him, Sell him": The Economic Dimensions of Spirituality in Vanity-Fair

 

Sydney Bulthuisa

English Department

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

Of John Bunyan’s "The Pilgrim’s Progress," the Vanity-Fair is arguably its most well-known symbol, representing the moral pitfalls of materialism and a capitalist society. This paper explores Bunyan’s economic background and explains how such influences problematized his spiritual life, and furthermore how such issues were expressed in the famed Vanity-Fair scene. This paper provides intimate details of Bunyan’s inner religious turmoil, and through such examples offers an insight into why the writer chose to include such a location as the Vanity-Fair in "The Pilgrim’s Progress," arguing that this scene represents a culmination of spiritual triumph both in the lives of the character Christian as well as of Bunyan himself.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Reshaping Pharmacy Practice During the COVID-19 Pandemic

 

Kristin Burrowsb & Dr. Mariette Sourial

Department of Pharmaceutical Practice

Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy

 

 

About

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic, changing the health industry in unimaginable ways. The pandemic led to lockdowns, limiting cross border travel, and public health recommendations of isolation, social distancing, and mask wearing. Despite these challenges, pharmacists maintained their delivery of pharmaceutical care and health services. Particularly, in the community setting, the professional roles of pharmacists are commonly perceived by the public as dispensers or retailers of medication, and their abilities are generally underutilized. The pandemic shifted these views, placing pharmacists as key mitigators in this outbreak through their contributions to public health functions. Pharmacists became primary resources within their communities, increased their collaboration with healthcare providers, and offered virtual consultations. Their

critical contributions in healthcare have been accentuated and lawmakers voted to expand the role of pharmacists. Under the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness (PREP) Act, licensed pharmacists are now authorized to also order and administer FDA-approved

COVID-19 tests and vaccines. This evidence-based presentation will highlight how COVID-19 has revolutionized pharmacy practice and the role of pharmacists.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in College-Aged Students

 

Dr. Matthew J. Mitchell, Nathan McBrayera, Chloe Ramdata, Sarah Manuela, Mikayla Goldena, John Suttera & Sydney Eppehimera

Department of Health & Human Performance

School of Education & Behavioral Studies

 

 

About

Newer indicators like increased arterial stiffness and increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT), measured via B mode ultrasound technology have been used as political indicators of cardiovascular disease. This study analyzed differences in potential CVD indicators like family history, anthropometric measures, health/fitness related measures, and carotid artery vessel dynamics. Mean values for CIMT (0.54mm+.58), peak systolic pulse wave velocity (0.021mm/sec +0.143), end-diastolic pulse wave velocity (.54mm+0.58), pulsatility index (1.776+0.356), resistance index (0.752+0.052) were similar within normal limits. There was no correlation between carotid artery measures and any health/fitness measurements. There was some evidence that was family risk factors and arterial values were different among cultural backgrounds.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Applying Medicinal Chemistry and Translational Research Toward Optimization of Linezolid Therapy in Patients with Renal Impairment

 

Dr. Ernane Souza

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy

 

 

 

About

Linezolid dosing is not modified in renal impairment despite studies demonstrating higher systemic exposures and an increased risk of myelosuppression in this specific population. The present study aimed to characterize the concentrations of linezolid and its major metabolites in patients with and without renal impairment after multiple dosing. This study was conducted in 39 adults (n = 22 with renal impairment); serum samples were collected under steady state conditions between 4-7 days after start of treatment and analyzed by LC-MS/MS to determine concentrations of linezolid and its major metabolites (PNU-142300 and PNU-142586). In patients with renal impairment, the median (IQR) concentrations of linezolid, PNU-142300, and PNU-142586 were 12.3 (8.0-18.1), 5.2 (3.8-10.9), and 13.8 (9.7-24.6) mg/L, respectively. These values were 1.6-, 3.3-, 2.8-fold higher for linezolid, PNU-142300 and PNU-142586, respectively, compared to patients without renal impairment. Medicinal chemistry rationale was applied to propose a potential toxicophore that may be responsible for an increased myelosuppression risk. Future studies should evaluate the potential toxicological implications of increased linezolid metabolite levels, especially in individuals with impaired kidney function.

Sowing Seeds of Growth: Biblical Insights into the Roles of Land, Natural Resources, and Investment When Teaching Development Economics

 

Dr. Cora Barnhart

Rinker School of Business

 

 

About

Courses in developmental economics cover a number of topics that provide opportunities to connect students to scriptural passages, including inequity, resource allocation, and investment. This paper identifies some specific areas where incorporating these connections could be meaningful to students. Relevant Biblical examples and insight are included to more fully appreciate the relationship between these conventional determinants and their impact on economic development. An important part of this analysis examines the natural resource curse, a commonly cited challenge for developing economies.

Under the Influence: Sexual Attraction as the Overarching Power in Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon

 

Jessica Kieffera

English Department

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon defies expectations of detective fiction in that its primary driving force is not truth or justice, but sexual attraction. Though soaked with drama and violence, most hard-boiled detective stories remain true to their roots: the plots are centered on a crime committed, a perpetrator who is guilty of the crime, and justice for the victim of the crime. However, detective Sam Spade’s relationships and interactions with women, particularly Brigid O'Shaughnessy, do not simply add spice to the novel; they emerge as central to the development of the plot. With The Maltese Falcon, gender dynamics and sexual attraction seem to propel the narrative even more than logic, truth, or justice.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Neuromuscular Training Normalizes Plantar Pressure in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Subjects

 

Dr. Matthew J. Mitchell, Alexis Browna, & Emily Headleya

Department of Health & Human Performance

School of Education & Behavioral Studies

 

 

About

The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a motor skill development program on static postural balance, plantar pressures, and visual and physical reaction time in subjects in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Seventeen ASD subjects (age: 12-21 yrs, height: 65.78+4.45 in, weight: 158.02+40.00 Ibs) participated in a golf-instruction program (First Tee of the Palm Beaches and PGA REACH) occurring twice a week for 6 weeks. The individual programs lasted for 45 minutes and all sessions worked on different core golf skills while previously learned skills were reviewed and integrated. Following six weeks of neuromuscular training plantar pressures and surface area improved and exhibited more normal distributions. This is in line with previous research done in our laboratory. There were no significant changes in static equilibrium measures, gait kinematics or kinetics followed six weeks of training.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Advocating Better Funding for Vocational Training in Community Colleges

 

Madeline Cogginsa

History Department

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

As part of my Freidheim Fellows independent study, my ongoing research this semester will explore the importance of vocational training at community colleges. Based on a variety of sources and interviews, this research will explore the history of community colleges, the current system and how it operates, and potential policy proposals for better funding and support of vo-tech programs. Education is the cornerstone of a functioning democracy. Receiving a quality education has the potential to drastically better the standard of living and success of local communities and the nation as a whole. In the United States, society has placed an increasing emphasis on four-year university as the most legitimate form of higher education. Consequently, social opinion has romanticized the four-year university and fostered a dim view of community colleges. Nonetheless, the role of vo-tech programs at community colleges is of critical importance for fostering development, increasing social and economic mobility, and providing affordable education for Americans in need.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Color Mediated Behavior in South Florida Sergeant Major Damselfish, Abudefduf saxitilis

 

Zachariah James Millera

Department of Biology

School of Arts & Sciences

 

 

About

Under breeding conditions, male sergeant major damselfish, Abudefduf saxatilis, display bluish-black coloration, as well as heightened activity and aggression levels. Not only do these fish show increased aggression toward other nesting males, but also many different species that range into the nesting area. The mechanism that drives this behavior has not yet been described. Observations and relevant literature suggest that a color-mediated aggression response is plausible. When exposed bluish-black hues resembling nesting coloration, increased aggression behavior is observed. These results support the idea that color plays a role in A. saxatilis competitive behavior. If this is the case, further research into understanding the role of color plays in ichthyofaunal interactions could yield economic and ecological benefits.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

1a,25-Dihydroxy Vitamin D3, the Active Form of Vitamin D3, Protects Against Allergen-Induced Airway Constriction

 

Dr. Harm Maarsingh, Anthony Bolsonb, Alejandro Lopezb, & Dr. Matthew DellaVecchia

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy

 

 

About

A hallmark of asthma is allergen-induced bronchoconstriction caused by mast cell mediators, like histamine. Vitamin D3 deficiency contributes to the pathophysiology of allergic diseases, including asthma. Vitamin D3 is converted into 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 (25-HVD3) and subsequently into the active form, 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 (1α,25-DHVD3).

We now investigated the role of vitamin D3 in regulating allergen-induced bronchoconstriction in asthma.

Precision cut lung slices (PCLS) were obtained from guinea pigs that were IgE-sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). PCLS were pre-treated with or without vitamin D3 compounds for 30 minutes and bronchoconstriction to OVA or histamine was monitored using video-assisted microscopy.

OVA induced a dose-dependent and full constriction of intrapulmonary airways. 25-HVD3 (5 μM) and 1α,25-DHVD3 (1 μM) reduced airway sensitivity to OVA 10-fold (p<0.05) and ~250-fold (p<0.01), respectively, without affecting maximal constriction. 1α,25-DHVD3 did not affect bronchoconstriction induced by exogenous histamine, indicating that 1α,25-DHVD3 inhibits the release of mast cell mediators rather than reducing the responsiveness to these mediators.

In conclusion, the vitamin D3 pathway protects against allergen-induced airway constriction, presumably by reducing allergen-induced mast cell degranulation.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Student and Faculty Poster Presentations

5-HTR2A Polymorphisms 102T/C and -1438A/G and Major Depressive Disorder:

A Meta-Analysis

 

Krystal Whitea & Dr. Angie McDonald

Behavioral Neuroscience Program

School of Arts & Sciences 

 

 About

102T/C and -1438A/G are two Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) on the Serotonin Receptor 2A gene (5-HTR2A) in near complete linkage disequilibrium. Numerous gene association studies have examined the relationships between either of these two polymorphisms and depression, with conflicting results. This meta-analysis analyzed 23 studies, 17 of which included 102T/C (n = 6805), and 12 of which included -1438A/G (n = 4798). Pooled Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals were calculated for both SNPs according to four genetic models. Results were nonsignificant for all 8 models, suggesting that genotype alone does not play a significant role in genetic susceptibility. However, it is possible that epigenetic regulation at these sites does play a role in depression susceptibility, which may explain some of the studies that find an association. The alleles most often connected with a higher depression risk, 102C and -1438G, both create a CpG site that Abdolmaleky et al. (2011) found to be differentially methylated in individuals with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder. Further research is needed into the methylation of these sites in individuals with Major Depressive Disorder.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Personality Frameworks of Pharmacy Preceptors Compared to the General US Population

 

Dr. Sara Trovinger & Jean Carlo Sarmientob

Department of Pharmacy Practice

Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy

 

About

The CliftonStrengths assessment, formerly Clifton StrengthsFinder, is a personal and educational tool developed by the Gallup organization. It measures a person’s strengths within 34 themes based on how the person naturally thinks, feels, and behaves. Data on the signature themes of 74 pharmacy preceptors with affiliation to Manchester University is compared to that of the 12,525,357 participants found in the CliftonStrengths Theme Frequency Report United States. The primary objective was to determine if a group of preceptors have the same or different signature themes than the signature themes of the US general population. Chi-Square tests or Fisher’s exact as appropriate were used along with visual constructs to analyze the data. There were three main statistical differences found in the Strategic Thinking domain. The Analytical, Intellection, and Learner themes all scored higher for the pharmacy preceptors (p = 0.04831, p = 0.00668, and p = 0.01528). In conclusion, preceptors exhibit a personality framework that characterizes a strategic, discipline executive ready to take on the task of teaching students and keeping harmony in between all the groups.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Is it Electronic Screen Syndrome or Internet Gaming Addiction?

 

Dr. Diane Esposito

School of Nursing

 

About

Some students today may have an increased use of technology, which includes dependency on cell phone communication such as texting, and can interfere with the development of positive social skills. Increased screen time impacts nervous system physiology. Students' use of Social Media may be a positive outlet for some, but others are seemingly addicted to it, and they also can be vulnerable to negativity, bullying or incivility. This poster will review screening questions for assessment of technology overuse, and identify some strategies for intervention and pediatric mental health promotion (Dunckley, 2017).

Dunckley, V. (2017). Electronic Screen Syndrome: Prevention and treatment. In Young, K. (Ed) and de Abreu, C. (Ed) Internet addiction in children and adolescents: Risk factors, assessment and treatment. Springer Publishing Co. Pgs. 213-242.

Sandy Bottom and Nearshore Reef Fish Assemblage in Palm Beach, Florida

 

Amberlyn Stuarta & Dr. Angela D. Witmer

Department of Biology

School of Arts & Sciences

 

About

Estimating the size of a fish population has previously been conducted by a visual census performed by snorkelers or divers. Newer approaches have shown that deploying underwater cameras can possibly yield more accurate estimations. Fish that are shy, or tend to hide when people are around, may be captured on camera footage. We performed a fish survey using baited underwater cameras along three transects (50m, 200m, and 250m from shoreline) to examine nearshore fish diversity among various habitats. We counted and identified 462 fish from 65 taxa. Results showed that the most abundant fish taxa comprised of 2 reef species, the silver porgy and slippery dick, which together comprised 22% of all observed organisms. The top eight species were examined. The 50m, sandy bottom transect was observed with the least abundance and fewest taxa (3), while the 250m, hardbottom, reef transect possessed the greatest species richness and highest abundance. The high abundance and richness in coral reef habitats is expected as reefs create complex physical structure and habitats.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Identifying the Base: Second Year Baseline Study of Subtidal Macrofauna

 

Sierra Kinga & Dr. Angela D. Witmer

School of Arts & Sciences

 

About

Macrofaunal invertebrates are a crucial to the food web as they are a food source to many larger animals. This study examined richness and abundance of marine benthic macrofauna living in the subtidal zone off Palm Beach Island, Florida. We sampled a total of 60 cores along four transects (50m, 100m, 150m, and 200m from low tide line). Three sediment cores were taken at each transect for grain size analysis. 176 benthic organisms were identified from 27 taxa. 65% of the total organisms collected comprised of five taxa: Ancinus depressus (21.0%), Aricidea sp. (16.5%); Scoloplos fragilis (11.4%), Sipuncula (8.5%), Scolelepsis squamata (8.0%).

Organismal presence was found to be significantly different between transects. Grain size was not found to be significantly different between transects. These results create a baseline dataset useful for comparison after a disturbance event such as beach nourishment projects, hurricanes, red tide.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Sports Pharmacy: A Retrospective Look into Performance Enhancing Drug (PED) Violations Among Athletes from 2017–2019

 

Malak Hasanb, Javier Barrios Herrerab, Dr. Matthew J. DellaVecchia, & Dr. Catherine Harrington

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy

 

About

Many athletes use drugs or dietary supplements to gain a potential competitive advantage over their competition. While some athletes intentionally misuse prescription medications, others unwittingly violate their sport’s governing agency rules by ingesting OTC supplements adulterated with PED. PED violations have financial, professional, and long-term health consequences. In 2019, pharmacists obtained a median annual wage of $128,090. Combining knowledge of pharmaceutical sciences and drug information, pharmacists can educate athletes regarding the risks associated with supplement/prescription medication usage to reduce PED violations in a cost-efficient manner.

Goals:

Primary: To identify commonly utilized PEDs among college and professional athletes in the United States from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2019 and discuss the potential role of pharmacists in mitigating future PED violations.

Secondary: To assess the financial consequences of PED violations.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Neuropsychological Assessment of Spatial and Nonspatial Learning and Memory in Rats Follow Ketamine Exposure During Late Adolescence

 

Julianna Davisa,2, Miranda Heita,1, Kimberly Wooda,2, Ashley Fravela,2, & Dr. David M. Compton1,2

Department of Psychology1

Behavioral Neuroscience Program2

School of Arts & Sciences

 

About

Looking for a good time at the club? Try ketamine – side effects may include dissociation, hallucinations, and memory impairments. With the prevalent issue of drug abuse in society, research regarding the effects of ketamine, a frequent drug of abuse, has increased.

Despite its ability for misuse, ketamine has demonstrated potential as a fast-acting antidepressant and seems to work well at relieving treatment-resistant depression. However, previous research has demonstrated ketamine use may cause impairments in frontal and medial temporal lobe functioning, leading to problems with working and episodic memory. While previous research has examined the short-term impacts of ketamine use, the present study used rat models to examine the long-term effects on memory caused by repeated ketamine use during late adolescence. The results indicated that low-ketamine dosed rats demonstrated significantly better spatial memory compared to high-ketamine dosed rats. In addition, high-ketamine dosed rats struggled with working memory more than the low-ketamine and control groups. This suggests that higher doses of ketamine during late adolescence may cause working and spatial memory impairments later in life.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

The Archer Daniels Midlands Case: Embracing Sustainability for Real?

 

Corrine Schreinera & Dr. Velma Lee

Rinker School of Business

 

About

The future of work is pointed towards the notion of circular economy where Kramer and Porter (2016) suggests linking sustainable public procurement and sustainable business models. Many businesses, however, are still in the process of learning and embracing sustainability. Typical sustainability literature suggests four models of sustainability: economic, philanthropic, social web, and integrative which involves different commitment levels to sustainability. This is a teaching case written based on researching secondary data of a major agribusiness player in the industry. It illustrates the challenges, processes, and strategies that executives may encounter and deploy to steer their organizations towards the integrative model of sustainability, involving all constituents to enhance the organizations’ position in contributing beyond self-existence, but a global and circular community.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Direct Oral Anticoagulant (DOAC) Utilization Assessment to Prepare for Joint Commission National Safety Goal for Anticoagulation Therapy

 

Dr. John Dougherty, Nkiru Anyagaligbob, Katerina Xub, & Sheldon Lefkowitzb

 

About

Purpose. This study assessed medication reconciliation, ordering, dispensing, and administration activities of apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban for venous thromboembolism (VTE) treatment and stroke risk reduction in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF).

Methods. The study was a retrospective, process improvement analysis of patients for whom apixaban, dabigatran or rivaroxaban was prescribed by a hospitalist at a large community hospital. Measures included appropriate DOAC dosing, appropriate management during transition from parenteral anticoagulant to DOAC, DOAC scheduling/administration compliance, inpatient DOAC dosing and significant drug interactions.

Results. The study included 98 patients, 52 females and 46 males. The mean age was 64.4 years old (range 20 to 100 years). DOAC indications included DVT (16), PE (26), and AF (56). There was delay in initiation of DOACs in all 8 patients administered UFH and 4 of the 5 patients administered enoxaparin.

Conclusions. The study results highlight gaps in compliance with the new NPSG for anticoagulation therapy. Educational efforts for hospitalists, pharmacists, and nurses will be initiated to improve their understanding of DOAC characteristics when ordering and administrating these medications.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Medical Waste on Palm Beach Island Beaches

 

Alexis Leara & Dr. Linda Sedlacek

Department of Biology

School of Arts & Sciences

 

About

There has been an increase in the amount of biomedical waste collected on beaches in Palm Beach, Florida. The impact of this waste is unknown. We determined the amount of biomedical waste, type of medical waste, and distribution pattern. Over 1200 items were collected on beaches in 2018 and 2019. Items collected included syringes, needles, blood vials, Rx bottles, and IV components. These items are considered harmful to the environment, marine life, and humans. The most common type of material found in 2018 was syringes. In 2019, beaches samples were denoted north, middle, and south in reference to their geographical region on Palm Beach Island. After statistical analysis, the results indicated there was no correlation in the amount of waste found between the different geographical regions. Future studies need to determine if specific waste items are found more commonly on specific beaches.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Ethical Dilemmas as a Teaching Modality for Nursing and Pharmacy Students

 

Dr. Jane C. Wilson1 & Dr. Mariette Sourial2

School of Nursing1; Gregory School Pharmacy2

 

About 

Purpose: To assess whether incorporating team Objective Structured Clinical Encounters (TOSCE) into an Interprofessional Education (IEP) session with nursing and pharmacy students would improve students’ satisfaction and achieve competencies of interprofessional education focusing on ethical and legal principles/professional judgement.

Methods (design, sample, setting, measures, analysis): An exploratory descriptive pilot study of 114 undergraduate nursing and pharmacy students participated in three contemporary healthcare ethical debates dramatized by theater department students.

Results: Students reported increased ability to maintain a climate of mutual respect, shared values, and team dynamics. They reported better use of the knowledge of their role and those of other professions to appropriately address healthcare needs of patients. Most rated their satisfaction with this IPE session from average to good.

Conclusion and Implications: Introducing TOSCE in an IPE session by debating ethical and legal principles/professional judgement allowed students to practice principles of shared values and ethics central to the commitment to collaboration and to gain an understanding of their unique and shared roles and ethical responsibilities.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Effects of Copepod Population on PST Induction in the Dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense

 

Christina Batoh1 & Dr. Hans G. Dam2

Department of Biology

School of Arts & Sciences1

University of Connecticut2

 

 

About

We tested whether copepod-mediated paralytic shellfish toxin (PST) induction in Alexandrium fundyense differs with predator-prey evolutionary history. Toxin induction was compared between Acartia hudsonica copepods historically exposed (Maine) and naïve (New Jersey) to A. fundyense blooms. Induction of directly grazed cells (direct induction) and cells receiving only grazer cues (indirect induction) was measured. These effects were separated using cages; restricting copepods and directly grazed cells to one compartment, and indirectly-induced algae to another. Waterborne cues passed between compartments. Toxin content of induced cells was compared to ungrazed controls. We also determined if grazer interaction with A. fundyense was required to create an inducing cue using treatments of starved grazers. Induction in cells within cages was greater than controls for both populations of copepod (ANOVA, p < 0.0001), but degree of induction was independent of population (p > 0.05). Induction in cells outside cages of starved copepods was only apparent for the Maine population (ANOVA; p < 0.0001). This plastic response of A. fundyense to A. hudsonica from Maine may be evolutionarily advantageous in defense against co-evolved predators.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Differences in Drop Jump Test Indicies and Anticipatory Neuromuscular Activation Between Dancers and Athletes: An Indicator of ACL Injury Risk

 

Rylee Vaughana, Alaina Hendricksa, & Dr. Matthew J Mitchell

Department of Health & Human Performance

School of Education & Behavioral Studies

 

About

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are especially prevalent in younger athletes, specifically female athletes. Research shows that jump landing dynamics my me predictive of ACL injury. Twenty-seven female subjects (dancers and collegiate athletes) from Palm Beach Atlantic University participated in the study. Each participant performed a Drop Jump Test while surface EMG signals in select lower leg muscles and ground reaction forces (BTS Bioengineering, Milan IT) were measured. Knee injury histories were documented in all subjects. The results showed no significant difference between the athletes and the dancers neuromuscular activation. Further research in this may be useful for the coaches or dance instructors so that they may be aware of who is at risk to prevent the athlete or dancer from an ACL injury through proper landing techniques and muscle activation and strength. Additionally, these findings may call for further studies to see if dancers have a greater or lesser risk for ACL injuries compared to the traditional athlete.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

The Immediate Impacts of Beach Renourishment on Subtidal Benthic Macrofauna

 

Sierra Kinga

Department of Biology

School of Arts & Sciences

 

About

Beach renourishments are a preventative measure taken against erosion where sand from various sources is pumped onto the beach to widen it. The bulk movement of sand caused by beach renourishment projects alters subtidal benthic macrofaunal environments. This study will examine the short-term effects of beach renourishment projects on a benthic subtidal macrofauna community by measuring change in overall abundance, relative abundance, and taxa richness. Samples were collected at old Worth Ave. pier in Palm Beach Florida. One set of samples was taken before a beach renourishment project, while the other was taken shortly after a beach renourishment project. There was no significant change in overall abundance or taxa richness, but there was a change in relative abundance when comparing between transects. These results show that beach renourishment projects alter macrofaunal communities in the short term by altering the relative abundances between transects. This is important because macrofauna are a crucial piece to the food web as they are consumed by many larger animals such as fishes and shore birds.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Direct Oral Anticoagulant (DOAC) Utilization Assessment to Prepare for Joint Commission National Safety Goals for Anticoagulation Therapy

 

Dr. John A. Dougherty

Department of Pharmacy Practice

Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy

 

 

About

 

Purpose

This study assessed medication reconciliation, ordering, dispensing, and administration activities of apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban for venous thromboembolism (VTE) treatment and in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF).

Methods

The study was a retrospective, process improvement analysis of patients for whom apixaban, dabigatran or rivaroxaban from June 2018 to November 2018. Measures assessed included appropriate DOAC dosing during the transition from outpatient to inpatient, appropriate management during transition from parenteral anticoagulant to DOAC, DOAC scheduling/administration compliance, inpatient DOAC dosing and significant drug interactions.

Results

The study included 98 patients, 52 females and 46 males. DOAC indications included DVT (16), PE (26), and AF (56). Overall, there were 713 administrations of a DOAC. The percentage of patients who missed, received late, or refused a DOAC was 14.9%.

Conclusions

Data retrieved concerning medication reconciliation, ordering, dispensing and administration of DOACs at a large community hospital admitted to the hospitalist’s service provided information for improvements. Gaps in compliance with the new NPSG for anticoagulation therapy.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Evaluating Direct Oral Anticoagulant Utilization in a Community Hospital

 

Dr. John A. Dougherty, Divya Desaib, & Abdullwab Shremo Msdib

Department of Pharmacy Practice

Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy

 

 

About

 

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to evaluate DOAC reconciliation, prescribing, and administration of apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban for venous thromboembolism (VTE) treatment to decrease stroke risk reduction.

Methods

The study was a retrospective, process improvement analysis of patients for whom apixaban, dabigatran or rivaroxaban was prescribed by a hospitalist at a community hospital from July 2019 to December 2019. Measures assessed included DOAC dosing during inpatient admission, appropriate transition from parenteral anticoagulant to DOAC, DOAC scheduling/administration compliance, and significant drug interactions.

Results

One-hundred twenty patients (mean age 70.5) were studied (69 females, 51 males). DOAC indications included DVT (30), PE (16), and AF (73) (median CHADS-VASc score 4), and multiple indications (9). Historical control patient group comparison showed dosing results were not statistically different (p=.44). There were 696 DOAC administrations assessed.

Conclusions

Data retrieved concerning medication reconciliation, prescribing, and administration of DOACs at a community hospital provided information for improvements. Educational efforts for hospitalists, pharmacists, and nurses will be initiated to improve their understanding of DOAC clinical characteristics.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Neuromuscular Training Normalizes Plantar Pressure in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Subjects

 

Dr. Matthew J Mitchell, Emily Headleya, & Alexis Browna

Department of Health & Human Performance

School of Education & Behavioral Studies

 

About

The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a motor skill development program on static postural balance, plantar pressures, and visual and physical reaction time in subjects in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Seventeen ASD subjects (age: 12-21 yrs, height: 65.78+4.45 in, weight: 158.02+40.00 Ibs) participated in a golf-instruction program (First Tee of the Palm Beaches and PGA REACH) occurring twice a week for 6 weeks. The individual programs lasted for 45 minutes and all sessions worked on different core golf skills while previously learned skills were reviewed and integrated. Following six weeks of neuromuscular training plantar pressures and surface area improved and exhibited more normal distributions. This is in line with previous research done in our laboratory. There were no significant changes in static equilibrium measures, gait kinematics or kinetics followed six weeks of training.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Differences in Muscle Oxygen Saturation and Electromyography Signals Between the Vastus Medialis and Vastus Lateralis During Incremental Cycling Exercise

 

Krishuana Williamsa, Dr. Matthew J. Mitchell, Sydney Eppehimera, John Suttera, & Hannah Moorea

Department of Health & Human Performance

School of Education & Behavioral Studies

 

About

The aim of the present study was to examine the differences in muscle oxygen saturation and electromyography signals between the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) during incremental cycling exercise. Muscle oxygen saturation SmO2) was measured using tissue-based near-Infared Spectrometry (Moxy Monitor, USA). Surface electromyography (EMG) were assessed using a Biopac EMG100D sampling at 200HZ and integrated using sample soothing via AcqKnowledge 4.0 (Biopac). SmO2 was significantly lower in the VL v. VM during Stage 2 (35.21% ± 10.5 v . 42.96% ±7.51), stage 3 (27.41% ± 12.27 v. 35.81 ± 10.75) and stage 4 (22.36% ± 12.96 v. 31.82 ±12.72) of an incremental cycling protocol on (Monark Ergomedic 874 E). There were also differences in the measures of mean EMG/MVC between the VL and the VM. The data suggest differing patterns of muscle usage and potentially fatigue during cycling exercise.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

The Effect of Intermittent Fasting on Body Composition and Blood Chemistry Markers

 

Dr. Matthew J Mitchell & Yesenia Hurtartea

Department of Health & Human Performance

School of Education & Behavioral Studies

 

About

Research has linked intermittent fasting to Improved body weight, lower blood pressure, decreased visceral fat, and lowered diabetes risk. Fourteen (subjects) were randomly selected to either a 6-week intermittent 14:10 protocol (IF) or a non fasting control group (CON). Body composition and key metabolities via a complete metabolic panel were analyzed before (PRE) and after (POST) the 6 weeks. Body fat percentage was unchanged (PRE v. POST) in both groups (IF: 21.25 ±9.62 v. 21.14 ± 9.85; CON: 22.05 ± 10.37 v. 21.05 ± 10.12). No significant changes were found in biochemical markers measured.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

The Decline of Nearshore Reef Fish Communities in Response to Beach Nourishment in South East Florida

 

Amberlyn Stuarta & Dr. Angela D. Witmer

Department of Biology

School; of Arts & Sciences

 

About

Nourishment projects are a commonly used process to prevent beach erosion. The costs and impacts of these projects on the surrounding environment and organisms are not well known. To monitor the impact of a nourishment project, this study collected fish community data using BUVC’s (baited underwater video cameras), as fish can be important indicators of how healthy an ecosystem is. The data collected was taken before (2019) and after nourishment (2020) along three transects: one close to shore (50m), one in between (200m), and one by a reef (250m). A majority of fish and different taxa were found along the 250m transects since there are more resources and habitats by the reef. Fewer fish and taxa were found at the 50m transect due to less resource and habitat availability. Results indicated that statistical differences were found between transects in 2019, but there was no statistical difference in the data before and after the nourishment. However, there were obvious changes in the number of taxa and the abundance of organisms found before and after the nourishment.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

The Effect of 8 Weeks of Resistance Training on Gait Kinematics During a “Stand Up And Go” Test and Normal Walking

 

Alison Austriaa, Emily Headleya, Mikayla Goldena, Dr. Matthew J. Mitchell, & Dr. Stephen Sylvester

 

Department of Health & Human Performance

School of Education & Behavioral Studies

 

About

Following a cancer diagnosis, exercise regimens have led to improvements in chronic fatigue, aerobic capacity and musculoskeletal strength. This investigation assessed changes in gait kinematics during sit-to-stand transitions and during walking in subjects experiencing cancer-related fatigue (CRF), following 8 weeks of exercise training. Twelve subjects (age: 68.36+9.23 yrs) were recruited for study participation. Before (PRE) and after (POST) 8 weeks of training, two tests were performed. First a Get Up and Go (GUP) test with the subject starting from a seated position, standing, walking 3 meters forward, returning to their original seat and sitting down. Second, each subject walked nine meters (9mW), turned 180 degrees and then returned nine meters to the original spot. Vertical Acceleration was significantly increased during the Sit-to-Stand portion of the GUP test (PRE: 7.13+2.24, POST: 8.86+2.44). Stride velocity during the 9mW test significantly increased in both the right (PRE: 1.25+0.33, POST 1.30+0.33) and left (PRE: 1.26+0.34 POST: 1.31 +0.34) legs. No measures during the Stand-to-Sit phase of the GUP test were significantly different. Walking Quality Index, Symmetry and Propulsion during the 9mW test were unchanged in PRE v POST. These data suggest resistance training appears may improve some aspects of gait in subjects suffering from cancer-related fatigue. Future research utilizing more specified training programs is needed.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Corporate Social Responsibility in Sustainable Agribusiness

Corrine Schreinera & Dr. Velma Lee

Rinker School of Business

 

About

The future of work is pointed towards the notion of circular economy where Kramer and Porter (2016) suggests linking sustainable public procurement and sustainable business models. Many businesses, however, are still in the process of learning and embracing sustainability. Typical sustainability literature suggests four models of sustainability: economic, philanthropic, social web, and integrative which involves different commitment levels to sustainability. This is a teaching case written based on researching secondary data of a major agribusiness player in the industry. It illustrates the challenges, processes, and strategies that executives may encounter and

deploy to steer their organizations towards the integrative model of sustainability, involving all constituents to enhance the organizations’ position in contributing beyond self-existence, but a global and circular community.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

A Selective Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibitor Relieves Pain without Causing Tolerance

Dr. Tarsis Brust, Gianna Giacolettib, Tatum Priceb, Abdulwhab Shremo Msdib, Katerina Vazquez-Faltob, & Dr. Adwoa Nornoo

Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy

 

About

Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of cAMP from ATP. Numerous different physiological processes are impacted by intracellular concentrations of cAMP. Among the ten different AC isoforms, studies with knockout animals indicate that inhibition of AC1 could relieve pain and reduce signs of opioid dependence. We previously identified ST034307 as a selective inhibitor of AC1. The development of an AC1-selective inhibitor now provides an opportunity to further study the therapeutic potential of inhibiting this protein. The present work represents a comprehensive pre-clinical study with the selective AC1 inhibitor ST034307. We have determined ST034307’s biodistribution to mouse blood and brain at different time points after injection. Additionally, we have shown that the compound is effective and comparable to morphine to relieve visceral and inflammatory pain in mouse models. Moreover, in contrast to morphine, ST034307 does not induce analgesic tolerance or disrupt mouse innate behavior (nesting). Our results indicate that AC1 inhibitors represent a promising new class of analgesic agents that treat pain and appear to produce less adverse effects than currently-used opioids.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student

Virtual Mindfulness Practice for Anxious Christians

 

Cambria Davisa

Department of Psychology

School of Arts & Sciences

 

About

Anxiety has been identified as a fear, or a constant state of worry, towards perceived danger. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) describes a program that offers assistance to individuals experiencing feelings of anxiety through emphasizing thoughts regarding the present moment. The current study investigated the effectiveness of virtual mindfulness practice among a sample of Christian college students with generalized anxiety disorder. Participants were 40 Christian college students recruited from Palm Beach Atlantic University who showed signs of anxiety. Participants viewed a brief 2-3-minute short video each day for two weeks describing Christian mindfulness practices to implement in order to reduce feelings of anxiety. The level of anxiety each day was recorded using a self-assessment scale from 1-10.

Notes: a undergraduate student. b graduate student