Important Definitions

PBA Community members include faculty, staff, adjuncts, students, vendors, and contractors. 

SARS-CoV-2 is a new virus in the Coronavirus family that can cause severe illness in some individuals while being completely asymptomatic in others.  COVID-19 is the name of the illness caused by SARS-CoV-2.

According to the CDC:

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as we learn more about COVID-19.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html

When to seek emergency medical attention:

Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/older-adults.html

Among adults, the risk for severe illness from COVID-19 increases with age, with older adults at highest risk. Severe illness means that the person with COVID-19 may require hospitalization, intensive care, or a ventilator to help them breathe, or they may even die.

Risk for Severe Illness Increases with Age

As you get older, your risk for severe illness from COVID-19 increases. For example, people in their 50s are at higher risk for severe illness than people in their 40s. Similarly, people in their 60s or 70s are, in general, at higher risk for severe illness than people in their 50s. The greatest risk for severe illness from COVID-19 is among those aged 85 or older.

CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-with-medical-conditions.html

People of any age with certain underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19:

People of any age with the following conditions are at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19:

COVID-19 is a new disease. Currently there are limited data and information about the impact of underlying medical conditions and whether they increase the risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Based on what we know at this time, people with the following conditions might be at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19:

Social distancing, also called “physical distancing,” according to the CDC means keeping space between yourself and other people outside of your home. To practice social or physical distancing:

  • Stay at least six feet (about two arms’ length) from other people
  • Do not gather in groups
  • Stay out of crowded places and avoid mass gatherings

Tracking is the process of ensuring that PBA community members who are sick, or who have COVID-19, or have been in close contact with a person who has COVID-19 follow recommended isolation and quarantine policies and procedures.  These policies and procedures are designed to limit the spread of COVID-19 and other communicable diseases to promote a health campus environment.  PBA tracks members of the campus community from symptom onset until well enough to return to the campus community through the Health Alert platform.

The Health Alert Team consists of the Director COVID-19 Operations and a team of nurses that:

  • reviews all Daily Wellness Checks and answers questions from employees and students regarding COVID-19.
  • conducts informational interviews that determine whether an individual needs to be isolated, quarantined or cleared for return.
  • monitors community members who have tested positive, experienced symptoms or entered quarantine until they are cleared to return to campus.
  • reports all positive COVID-19 test results to the corresponding Health Department (Palm Beach or Orange County).
  • oversees on-campus testing.
  • ensures that the University is following the latest CDC guidelines appropriately as well as being compliant with local and state guidelines.

The purpose of COVID-19 Isolation is to separate people infected with SARS-CoV-2—the virus that causes COVID-19—from people who are not infected.

A PBA Community member who exhibits symptoms of COVID-19 will isolate if they 1) test positive for COVID-19 or 2) experience symptoms associated with COVID-19. The duration of isolation will be determined by the Health Alert Team, taking into account the person’s severity of symptoms, test results, health history, and date of symptom onset.

If a person has a COVID-19 positive test result and has previously tested positive or been diagnosed clinically with COVID-19 within the last 90 days, the person will not require isolation. However, they must provide documentation of their prior positive COVID-19 test or diagnosis.

A non-residential community member is expected to isolate off-campus in their place of residence. A residential student will isolate in their assigned residence hall or designated isolation apartments. A residential student may choose at any time during the isolation period to complete their isolation at an off-campus location.

Symptoms of COVID-19 may mimic other common illnesses and include:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as we learn more about COVID-19.  https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html

The purpose of Quarantine is to keep someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from the campus community to reduce the risk of transmission to others. A PBA community member will be asked to quarantine under the following condition: 1) A person is determined to have had close contact with someone with COVID-19 (as defined by the CDC) will quarantine for 14 days from the last date of contact. 2) A person who has been in close contact (according to the CDC guidelines) has major symptoms may be quarantined on a case by case basis. A person in quarantine may be cleared early if the close contact tests negative after the onset of the major symptoms.

A non-residential community member is expected to quarantine off-campus in their place of residence. A residential student will quarantine in their assigned residential room/apartment. A residential student may choose at any time during the quarantine period to complete their quarantine at an off-campus location. A residential student who quarantines off-campus is expected to communicate to their off-campus host their health status and potential maximum length of stay. A residential student who leaves campus for quarantine may not return until they have been cleared by Health Alert.

Contact tracing is a disease control measure. Public health professionals work with patients who have COVID-19 to develop a list of everyone they have been in close contact with during a certain period. The staff will then contact those people to let them know about their possible exposure so that they can take proper precautions.

Contact tracing is done by specially trained public health professionals at the State and County Health Departments. In general, these trained staff study patterns and causes of diseases in humans. Public health professionals tasked with contact tracing are experts in protecting client confidentiality, counseling, cultural competency, and more.

It’s important that you speak with a contact tracer if you have had potential exposure to COVID-19.  The Florida Department of Health urges all Floridians to answer calls from (833) 917-2880, (833) 443-5364 and (850) 583-2419  as this is part of Florida’s comprehensive contact tracing effort.

Facial Covering is a cloth or disposable material that is fashioned in such a way that it covers the nose and mouth, fitting snuggly against the side of the face. The face covering is secured with ties or ear loops, and allows for breathing without restriction.  Cloth facial coverings should be able to be laundered and machine dried without damage or change to shape.

High-Touch Surfaces are those that are handled ore receive frequent contact by numerous people including but not limited to door handles, door faces, push buttons, handrails, desktops and bathroom surfaces.

EACH MEMBER OF THE PBA COMMUNITY IS REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE IN A DIGITAL DAILY WELLNESS CHECK, WHICH REQUIRES YOU TAKE YOUR TEMPERATURE AND ANSWER QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR HEALTH.

In order to come to the PBA campus or University facilities, every faculty member, student, staff member, vendor and visitor will complete a wellness check prior to coming onto the campus.

A daily text message will be sent prompting the user to click a provided link. The first question asks if the user will be going to a University facility and/or campus on that day. If the answer is no, the survey stops. If the answer is yes, the wellness check requests that you answer questions about your temperature and potential COVID-19 symptoms, and also requires you to report if you have knowingly come into contact with anyone who has COVID-19 in the last 24-72 hours.

No member of the PBA community is permitted to come to a University facility if they are sick. PBA is committed to working with each member of the University community through their illness in order to help them be successful whether they are an employee or a student.