Summer Semester

Stay in West Palm Beach. Get ahead. Make memories.

Palm Beach Atlantic University offers five summer sections and two traditional summer semesters.  At an economical price point and an accelerated, flexible schedule, you could shave off an entire semester of your degree. There are even financial aid options available for many students. Register on myPBA.

west palm beach

Summer Scholars, PBA Lead and Propel Schedule

Saturday, July 30

Time
Activity
Location
9 a.m–4 p.m
Summer Scholars Move-in (Day 1) 
Residence Halls (wWarren Librarii
11 a.m–1:30 p.m
Brunch*
Fraser Dining Hall
11 a.m–5 p.m 
Sailfish Start - Get important information & complete Onboarding IIIII
Greene Complex
5–6:30 p.m
Dinner*
Fraser Dining Hall

Sunday, July 31

Time Activity Location
9 a.m–4 p.m Summer Scholars Move-in (Day 2)  Residence Halls
11 a.m–5 p.m 

Sailfish Start - Get important information & complete Onboarding 
Greene Complex
11 a.m–1:30 p.m Brunch* Fraser Dining Hall
4 -5 p.m
Campus Tour Find classrooms & primary campus resources  Meet at Greene Complex Portico
4 -5 p.m Parent Session: Parent Dedication/Life at PBA DeSantis Family Chapel
5-6:30 p.m  Dinner* Fraser Dining Hall
6-6:30 p.m
Welcome
Rubin Arena (Greene Complex)
6:30-7:30 p.m

Parent Ice Cream Social – SS/Propel Parents
***PBA Lead Parents will join at 7 PM***
Jack’s Coffee
  Breakout Sessions  
6:30-7 p.m  Propel Students
Lassiter Rotunda (Warren Library)
6:30-7 p.m PBA Lead Students & Parents
Rubin Arena (Greene Complex)
6:30-7 p.m  Summer Scholars DeSantis Family Chapel
7 p.m ResLife Speed-Friending Event  Baxter Green

Monday, August 1

Time Activity Location
7:30–9 a.m  Breakfast* Fraser Dining Hall
9 a.m–12 p.m Classes Begin  Assigned Classrooms (Warren Lib
11:30 a.m–1 p.m Lunch* Fraser Dining Hall
1 -2:30 p.m
Sailfish Start - Get important information & complete Onboarding IIIIII
Greene Complex
5-6:30 p.m Dinner* Fraser Dining Hall
* Meal swipes will be active for Summer Scholars Students only. Guests may purchase a meal at the reduced summer price of $9.99 plus tax.

 

Have Questions? 

Residence Life  (561) 803-2555 

Propel  (561) 803-2066 

PBA Lead  (561) 803-2302 

Summer Scholars  (561) 803-2233


 

Summer Semester Dates

Each section consists of three weeks. Students can only take one class per section. Classes are on campus and run from 9:00am-noon M-F.

  • Alpha: 5/9-5/27
  • Beta: 5/31-6/19
  • Gamma: 6/20-7/8
  • Epsilon: 8/1-8/19

Traditional Semester Dates

Alternatively, you may be eligible to register for online and evening courses, which will maintain traditional semester dates. Please check with your advisor.

  • Subterm A: 5/9-6/28
  • Subterm B: 6/29-8/21

Costs:

  • 4 classes for $5,000 for the summer.

Housing in Watson Hall:

  • Full Summer $2325; Three week session: $510

 

COURSE OFFERINGS INCLUDE:

Classes:


  • BIOV 4103 - Selected Topics in Biology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Intensive study of a selected topic, which provides students an opportunity to study in areas other than those elsewhere defined.


  • CHM 3301 - Biochemistry I Laboratory

1 Credit Hour(s)

The laboratory portion provides an experimental experience in working with biological active materials and familiarity with standard biochemical techniques. They may include spectrophotometry; chromatography; isotope-tracer techniques, ultracentrifugation; enzyme kinetics; and isolation, purification, and characterization of protein, nucleic acids, and subcellular organelles.

Prerequisite: CHM 2013 and CHM 2011 (Both with C- or better)

Corequisite: CHM 3303


  • CHM 3303 - Biochemistry I

3 Credit Hour(s)

The lecture portion provides an introduction to modern biochemical principles, structures and properties of biologically important molecules and macromolecules, the equilibrium and thermodynamics of biochemical systems, and metabolic processes leading to the generation and storage of cellular energy.

Prerequisite: CHM 2013 and CHM 2011 (Both with C- or better)

Corequisite: CHM 3301


  • BIO 2503 and BIO 2501- Principles of Microbiology

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introductory microbiology course for Nursing Majors specifically designed to meet the microbiology pre-requisite requirement for the 4-year BSN degree. The course will cover the basic principles of microbiology, including cellular organization, growth, and metabolism of major microbial groups (bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa); cultivation and control of microbes; and the interaction between microogranisms and humans as it relates to disease transmission, pathogenesis, control measures, and treatment. Emphasis will be placed on those concepts and methods that are significant in the medical setting.

Prerequisite: C- or above in BIO 1101 and BIO 1103, CHM 1111 and CHM 1123

Corequisite: BIO 2501. Course for Nursing Majors only.


  • HHP 3003 - Foundations of Nutrition

3 Credit Hour(s)

Basic concepts of nutrition including macro and micro nutrients, caloric balance, the food guide pyramid, weight gain/loss, the relationships between nutrition and human physiology are presented.


  • HUM 1023 - Humanities II: The World from 1000 to 1700

3 Credit Hour(s)

Second semester of the humanities sequence treats world history, literature, philosophy and art spanning from A.D. 1000-1700. The course will examine the emergence and development of Arabic culture within the context of the rise of Islam. In the Western world, the medieval period will be explored as both a recovery of classical antiquity and the integration of secular learning with sacred doctrine. Key issues treated in the Renaissance will include the renewal of skepticism, the beginnings of modern physical science, and the splintering of Christendom with the Reformation. Focusing on the reading of primary texts, readings may include Aquinas, Dante, Luther, and Shakespeare.

Prerequisite: Humanities I: Prehistory through 1000 A.D.


  • HUM 1033 - Humanities III: The World from 1700 to Present

3 Credit Hour(s)

Third semester of the humanities sequence: the modern and contemporary world (1700 to the present). Examines absolutism, the age of reason, political revolutions, industrial beginnings, development of democratic government, imperialism, the world wars, the gaining of independence of formerly colonial territories [as, e.g. Africa, India, South America], modernism and post-modernism, the post-Cold-War world; emphasis will be placed on key political, social, philosophical, scientific, ideological or cultural themes that shaped this time period. Focusing on the reading of primary texts, readings may include Rousseau, Voltaire, Romantic poets, Marx, Russian Realists, Modernist philosophy and psychology, Experimentation in literature, Existentialist writings, Post-Colonial studies [as e.g. Achebe, Spivak].

Prerequisite: Humanities I: Prehistory through 1000 A.D. and Humanities II: The World from 1000 to 1700


  • PLS 3003 - Freedom in American Society

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will examine the significance of freedom in American society. Topics to be explored include: the historical roots of American liberty, with particular attention to the relation between liberty and religion; the nature of freedom as understood by the chief architects of the American political order; the relation between political and economic freedom; the nature of government and of the market process; the meaning of the rule of law; the changing conceptions of freedom throughout American political development; the chief threats to individual freedom that have emerged over the past several centuries; and contemporary challenges to the preservation of freedom.

Prerequisite: ENG 1123, HUM 1013 and HUM 1023

Corequisite: HUM 1033


  • ENG 1123 - English Composition II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Intermediate expository and argumentative prose with emphasis placed on refining analytical reading skills, developing an informed approach to the research paper, and applying the rules and conventions of English prose. Note: Composition I and Composition II must be completed sequentially within the same academic year. In order to fulfill the requirement of the courses in the university core, students must earn at least a C- in each course.

Prerequisite: C- or better in English Composition I 


2 Credit Hour(s)

An introductory course examining the elements that comprise the art and technique of filmmaking. It explores the components comprising film, including cinematography, editing, sound and acting. Students will become acquainted with types of genres, the modes of production, marketing and exhibition. Students will learn to apply aesthetic criteria for interpreting and evaluating films as both art and story forms.

 


1 Credit Hour(s)

Survey of the components and benefits of physical fitness. Health related issues with attention to fitness assessment. Classroom learning combined with a variety of physical activities.

*Tri Fit fitness assessment fee

Classes:


  • CHM 1021 - General Chemistry I Laboratory

1 Credit Hour(s)

Fundamental principles of general chemistry including the topics of: properties of matter, measurements, calculations, atomic structure, stoichiometry, formulas, reactions, solutions, acid-base theory, and gases.

Prerequisite: A student must have taken College Algebra (MAT 1853) or higher (C grade or higher); High School Chemistry or Introductory Chemistry (CHM 1003/CHM 1000) (either with C grade or higher); and have a score of 13/20 or higher on the PBA Chemistry Department Diagnostic exam.

Corequisite: CHM 1013 and CHM 1010 
Availability: Fall/Spring/Summer


  • CHM 1023 - General Chemistry I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fundamental principles of general chemistry including: matter and measurements, atomic structure, periodicity; chemical formulas, equations and stoichiometry; chemical bonding, molecular structure, reactions, acid-base theory and calculations, gases.

Prerequisite: A student must have taken College Algebra (MAT 1853) or higher (C grade or higher); High School Chemistry or Introductory Chemistry (CHM 1003/CHM 1000) (either with C grade or higher); and have a score of 13/20 or higher on the PBA Chemistry Department Diagnostic exam.

Corequisite: CHM 1010 and CHM 1011 


  • HUM 1033 02 02 – Humanities III

3 Credit Hour(s)

Third semester of the humanities sequence: the modern and contemporary world (1700 to the present). Examines absolutism, the age of reason, political revolutions, industrial beginnings, development of democratic government, imperialism, the world wars, the gaining of independence of formerly colonial territories [as, e.g. Africa, India, South America], modernism and post-modernism, the post-Cold-War world; emphasis will be placed on key political, social, philosophical, scientific, ideological or cultural themes that shaped this time period. Focusing on the reading of primary texts, readings may include Rousseau, Voltaire, Romantic poets, Marx, Russian Realists, Modernist philosophy and psychology, Experimentation in literature, Existentialist writings, Post-Colonial studies [as e.g. Achebe, Spivak].

Prerequisite: Humanities I: Prehistory through 1000 A.D. and Humanities II: The World from 1000 to 1700 


  • PLS 3003 02 – Freedom in American Society

3 Credit Hour(s) 

This course will examine the significance of freedom in American society. Topics to be explored include: the historical roots of American liberty, with particular attention to the relation between liberty and religion; the nature of freedom as understood by the chief architects of the American political order; the relation between political and economic freedom; the nature of government and of the market process; the meaning of the rule of law; the changing conceptions of freedom throughout American political development; the chief threats to individual freedom that have emerged over the past several centuries; and contemporary challenges to the preservation of freedom.

Prerequisite: ENG 1123, HUM 1013 and HUM 1023
Corequisite: HUM 1033


  • BIO 2503 and BIO 2501- Principles of Microbiology

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introductory microbiology course for Nursing Majors specifically designed to meet the microbiology pre-requisite requirement for the 4-year BSN degree. The course will cover the basic principles of microbiology, including cellular organization, growth, and metabolism of major microbial groups (bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa); cultivation and control of microbes; and the interaction between microogranisms and humans as it relates to disease transmission, pathogenesis, control measures, and treatment. Emphasis will be placed on those concepts and methods that are significant in the medical setting.

Prerequisite: C- or above in BIO 1101 and BIO 1103, CHM 1111 and CHM 1123

Corequisite: BIO 2501. Course for Nursing Majors only.


Classes:


  • CHM 1021 01L – General Chemistry II Laboratory

1 Credit Hour(s) 

Continuation of General Chemistry I Laboratory (CHM 1011)-Fundamental principles of general chemistry including: solution theory, colligative properties, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base equilibrium, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry.

Prerequisite: CHM 1013 (with C- or better), CHM 1010, CHM 1011(with C- or better)
Corequisite: CHM 1023 and CHM 1020


  • CHM 1023 01 – General Chemistry II

3 Credit Hour(s) 

Continuation of General Chemistry I (CHM 1013) Fundamental principles of general chemistry including: solution theory, colligative properties, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base equilibrium, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry

Prerequisite: CHM 1013 (with C- or better)
Corequisite: CHM 1020 and CHM 1021


Classes:

*This course is specific to incoming Propel Scholars Program participants.

**This course has a lab fee.


  • BIB 1003 - Exploring the Bible

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the biblical metanarrative and to enhance the student’s appreciation of this narrative as both formative and normative for life. Exploration of the biblical metanarrative will include the stories and characters within the biblical text, with attention given to the interdependent relationships between the stories which connect to form the larger narrative. Focus will dwell on God’s interaction with humanity and God’s desire for a relationship with God’s creation, especially as demonstrated within the covenantal narrative. Attention will be given to the genre and form of the biblical text, to the theological content and intent drawn from the narrative, and to the meta-narrative’s present-day significance.


  • BUS 1183 - Introduction to Business

3 Credit Hour(s)

Designed to provide students with a background in the major functional areas of business, such as accounting, finance, marketing, manufacturing, information systems, human resource management, business law, and international business. Provides a tour of the several areas related to business and is the basis for business terminology and concepts taught in other course work in the business area.


  • COM 1113 - Public Speaking

3 Credit Hour(s)

A study of the processes of oral communication, including critical thinking and listening. Experience in public speaking with an emphasis on organization of material, articulation and nonverbal communication.

*This summer section of COM 1113 is available to Propel students only


  • EDU 2133 - Human Development and Learning

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course examines important learning theories and learning processes while emphasizing cultural and environmental influences on the learning experience.


  • ENG 1113 02 – English Composition I

3 Credit Hour(s) 

Introduction to academic expository prose with emphasis placed upon the writing process: defining and developing topics, organizing information and writing drafts, and revising and editing to practice the fundamentals of expository structure and style. Practice in the application of rhetorical patterns as well as review of grammar. Also includes practice in the fundamental techniques of writing and revision. Grades given are A, B, C, or Y (conditional incomplete—to be satisfied by repeating the course in the following semester).


  • PLS 3003 03 – Freedom in American Society

3 Credit Hour(s) 

This course will examine the significance of freedom in American society. Topics to be explored include: the historical roots of American liberty, with particular attention to the relation between liberty and religion; the nature of freedom as understood by the chief architects of the American political order; the relation between political and economic freedom; the nature of government and of the market process; the meaning of the rule of law; the changing conceptions of freedom throughout American political development; the chief threats to individual freedom that have emerged over the past several centuries; and contemporary challenges to the preservation of freedom.

Prerequisite: ENG 1123, HUM 1013 and HUM 1023


  • HON 1033 - Rhetorical Eloquence

3 Credit Hour(s)

A performance class in which students develop public speaking skills and explore rhetorical theory. Emphasis is placed on the role of rhetoric in the Christian/Western tradition. From a distinctively Christian perspective, this course contemplates the relationship between rhetoric and truth, the aims and tools of the ideal orator, and the role of persuasion in improving the community and the individual.

Summer Scholars 2022

ABOUT

The program is the option to take a 3-week intensive course during the final summer sub-term. The class consists of a teaching block Monday through Friday, 9AM to 12PM, so you will only be able to take one of the available courses.

  • Dates

    • 8/1-8/19 (Overlaps with the Epsilon Summer session)
  • Costs

    • Resident Cost: $695 for this upcoming semester, which includes one course (3 credits), housing and a limited meal plan. 
    • Commuter Cost: $200 for this upcoming semester, which includes one course (3 credits)
  • Courses 

  • BIB 1003 SS – Exploring the Bible: Kathy Maxwell, Nathan Maxwell.  8/1 – 8/19/2022
  • BUS 1183 SS – Introduction to Business: David Smith.  8/1 – 8/19/2022
  • COM 1113 SS – Public Speaking: Katherine Chute.  8/1 – 8/19/2022
  • EDU 2133 SS – Human Development and Learning: Timothy Ladd.  8/1 – 8/19/2022
  • ENG 1113 SS – English Composition I: Nicole Straussman.  8/1 – 8/19/2022
  • HON 1033 SS – Rhetorical Eloquence: Thomas St. Antoine.  8/1 – 8/19/2022
  • HON 1133 SS - Writing About Literature. 8/1 – 8/19/2022
  • HUM 1013 SS – Humanities I: Elizabeth Todd.  8/1 – 8/19/2022
  • PLS 3003 SS – Freedom in American Society: Linda Reader.  8/1 – 8/19/2022

Register 

Register for Summer Scholars here

To register for all other summer classes, students can sign up via myPBA here (you must be signed in to access the page). 

Contact

Questions? Contact Academic GPS at Academic_GPS@pba.edu or visit them in Hood Hall.