Students walking on PBA campus

 

 

Faculty of the Honors Program

 

Jenifer Elmore

Professor of English

Teaches: Writing about Literature, The World of Christendom and Islam

David Horkott

Associate Professor of Philosophy

“I am passionate about teaching in the honors program because learning is an inherently fulfilling activity for me and my students. The honors program shapes moral and intellectual character, and students gain a finer sense of taste and personal style. Studying the great books and great ideas of Western European culture prepares students for useful careers outside of the university. Finally, studying in the Supper Honors program at PBAU contributes to students' ability to function as bold and responsible citizens. In America we govern ourselves - we owe it to ourselves to be as enlightened as possible.”

Teaches: The World of Polis and Covenant, The World of Caesar and Christ, The World of Humanism and Reform, The World of Reason and Revolt

Sam Joeckel

Professor of English

"The Supper Honors Program is what I love best about teaching at PBA. It draws students who possess three qualities that make education come alive: intelligence, intellectual curiosity, and big personalities. The first two qualities create the conditions for a vigorous wrestling with ideas. The last quality makes the whole enterprise a blast. Teaching and guiding students who possess these three qualities is a joy and an honor."

Teaches: The World of Humanism and Reform, The World of Reason and Revolt, The World of Despair and Hope

Carl Miller

Associate Professor of English

"On a campus rife with talent, the students of the Supper Honors Program are truly exceptional. I love the opportunity to work with students early in the program in the Writing About Literature seminar; their potential is staggering, their diversity and intellect make for incredible class discussion, and their final writing productivity is always an affirmation of the course, the program, and the students’ future elite work in a wide variety of academic fields.”

Teaches: Writing about Literature

Nathan Maxwell

Associate Professor of Biblical Studies

"The Supper Honors classroom is a space where faculty renew their love for learning and students cultivate a keen sense for the enduring value of the liberal arts – a formative pilgrimage travelled together with a diversity of classmates and colleagues. "

Teaches: The World of Polis and Covenant

Francisco Plaza

Professor of Politics

"The honors program allows me the opportunity to encourage young students to reflect on the fundamental questions of human life through the works of the great authors. I am privileged to witness the intellectual and spiritual growth of our honors students in their journey to adulthood."

Teaches: The World of Polis and Covenant, The World of Caesar and Christ

Gary Poe

Professor of History

"I enjoy teaching in the Honors program because of its focus on primary sources. We really get to dig into the texts and wrestle with the ideas there. But we just don’t read these texts we look at the bigger questions of life that transcend time. We get to interact with some of the ‘greats’ of history and wrestle with their ideas and how they approached this life and beyond. This can lead to transformative conversations on what it means to be a thinking Christian in today’s world and what it truly means to live the Christian life. Watching our students grown and develop makes it all worthwhile!"

Teaches: The World of Polis and Covenant, The World of Caesar and Christ, The World of Christendom and Islam, Dr. Poe also leads the Honors Travel-Study program

Linda Raeder

Professor of Politics

Teaches: The Roots of American Order

Beate Rodewald

Associate Professor of English

Teaches: The World of Christendom and Islam, The World of Humanism and Reform, The World of Reason and Revolt, The World of Despair and Hope

Tom St.Antoine

Professor of Communication

“Life in the Honors Program resembles British residential colleges and early American colleges. Classes are small. Students read and discuss primary sources rather than textbooks. They take ownership in their education and motivate one another and themselves. Our students graduate well prepared for graduate schools and for careers.”

Director, Frederick M. Supper Honors Program

Elizabeth Stice

Associate Professor of History

"I enjoy teaching in Honors because I love reading old texts and I enjoy helping students connect to different ideas and worldviews."

Teaches: Humanism & Reform, Reason & Revolt

Eric Tippin

Assistant Professor of English

"I appreciate how the PBA honors program fulfils the liberal arts ideal of treating knowledge as a good end in itself. And, as John Henry Newman writes, the “good” of knowledge “is not only good, but reproductive of good.” The honors program approaches our great books inheritance as a gift to be cherished, not as an ideological or professional tool, and this approach is itself a great gift to our students."

Teaches: Writing About Literature