Assistant Professor of French/Humanities

Garren, Mirela

Photo: Garren

Contact Info

Campus: West Palm Beach

Phone: (561) 803-2298
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School and Department

The School of Arts and Sciences
Foreign Languages (UG)
Humanities (UG)

Faculty Profile

Full Name: Mirela Garren

Assistant Professor of French/Humanities
Assistant Professor of French and Humanities


B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Universitatea “Al. I. Cuza” Din Iasi (Romania); Ph.D., University d’Artois (France)

With over 16 years of French teaching experience, Dr. Garren has enjoyed working in both secondary and post-secondary settings and is proud to have built a proven record of academic excellence in teaching the French language, literature and culture. She is a dedicated and enthusiastic Christian educator, very motivated and hard-working, always striving for excellence, always focusing on developing each student's performance character in order to raise achievement, always going above and beyond to make each academic year a successful one, filled with numerous rewarding experiences, by maximizing her students’ learning experiences. From 1999 to 2006, Dr. Garren was involved in the European Union’s educational initiatives such as the Socrates and Comenius programmes, attracting several fully funded grants aimed to encourage students and teachers to gain an understanding of the European dimension to teaching and learning via student/teacher mobility activities and in-service trainings. Dr. Garren’s two other passions besides teaching are theatre and literature. Between 2000 and 2007, she introduced both high school and college students to the world of theatre by successfully coordinating a theatrical group of French expression that has won numerous national and international awards. Dr. Garren’s interest for literature constantly feeds itself on reading, writing, and publishing locally, nationally and internationally. Her most illustrious literary accomplishment is her doctoral thesis, “Alienation and Absurd in the New Theatre of the 1950s: Eugene Ionesco, Samuel Beckett and Arthur Adamov,” demonstrating how three playwrights from different cultural backgrounds and views changed the 1950’s theatrical scenery, by expressing their feelings of alienation in an incomprehensible and irrational world where human beings live the incurable experience of the Absurd, while also building a “new” metaphysical, symbolic and allegorical theatre based on traditional aesthetic and artistic procedures, yet serving a modern philosophical approach, profoundly related to existentialism.